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At Home in Utopia

by Michal Goldman and Ellen Brodsky

New York City cops in the Great Depression called it Little Moscow, but for the 2,000 Jewish immigrant residents of the United Workers Cooperative Colony, a.k.a. “the Coops,” it was their first taste of the American dream. At Home in Utopia bears witness to an epic social experiment, following two generations of residents and their commitment to radical ideas of racial equality and rights for tenants and workers.

Independent Lens

Bill T. Jones: A Good Man

by Gordon Quinn, Bob Hercules, Joanna Rudnick, and Keith Walker

Bill T. Jones: A Good Man follows the Tony Award-winning choreographer Bill T. Jones as he conceives and executes a dance production based on the life of Abraham Lincoln. The New York Times claimed that Jones's "portrayal of Lincoln is likely to scandalize as many people as it delights."

American Masters

Billy Strayhorn: Lush Life

by Robert Levi

The composer of "Take the A-Train" and other Duke Ellington hits, Billy Strayhorn struggled with obscurity and prejudice as a successful gay man in the tumultuous middle of the 20th century.

Independent Lens

Brother to Brother

By Rodney Evans, Jim McKay, and Aimee Schoof

Bruce Nugent, the black gay writer who co-founded the journal Fire!! with Langston Hughes and others, inspires a gay teenager through memories of the Harlem Renaissance.

Independent Lens

From Mambo to Hip Hop: A South Bronx Tale

by Steve Zeitlin, Henry Chalfont, and Elena Martinez

A former symbol of urban decay, the South Bronx is also known as a creative breeding ground and for its enduring cultural spirit.

Voces

Front Wards, Back Wards

by William C. Rogers

Fernald State School, America’s first institution for individuals with developmental disabilities, was founded in Massachusetts in 1848 and still operates today. It stands as a powerful case study of an endeavor in which the best of intentions go awry.

The Great Pink Scare

by Tug Yourgrau and Dan Miller

The little-known 1960 felony conviction of three gay Smith College professors marked the peak of sexual McCarthyism, pitting an individual’s right to privacy against national security claims.

Independent Lens

Hiding and Seeking: Faith and Tolerance After the Holocaust

by Menachem Daum

Filmmaker Menachem Daum passes on the lessons he learned from his parents’ post-Holocaust crisis of faith to his own children and grandchildren, hoping to show how to be true to one’s deepest beliefs while being open to all people.

POV

July '64

by Christine Christopher and Carvin Eison

In the summer of 1964, a three-night riot erupted in two predominantly black neighborhoods in downtown Rochester, New York.

Independent Lens

Let the Fire Burn

by Jason Osder

Documentary brings to life one of the most tumultuous clashes between government and citizens in modern U.S. history, as a longtime feud between Philadelphia police and controversial radical urban group MOVE came to a tragic climax in 1985.

Independent Lens

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